Thursday, April 24, 2008

BART police and food violator come face to face

Two BART police officers walked up and down the trains during my ride home Thursday. They are probably patrolling the train and looking for something questionable. There was a man eating Burger King in my train car and I was bothered by the smell the entire ride. I'm not the only one who minded the smell. It stunk. When I saw the BART police officers, I was very happy. "Perfect timing!" I thought! They've gotta say something to this man. I'm sure they can smell it too! Burger and fries are delicious but the smell does NOT mix well with stinking carpet and seats, lack of oxygen, perfume, body odor, and lord knows what else. Any food smells bad on BART!

Now, I'm not naive, I'm sure these BART police officer were hunting for a criminal as they paced leisurely down the aisle (yes, there is sarcasm here!), chatting with each other about the San Jose Sharks. No, but seriously, I'm sure their presence on the train make BART safer, in some way. I'd rather have them around than not! When the BART police saw the man stuffing a handful of fries in his mouth, I was thinking to myself, "AH HA! You are caught!". Oh, how wrong I was. Both of them looked at him and just walked away! OK, maybe they were in a rush to catch a criminal (yeah, ok) but they could have at least said something to him. Something as quick as, "No food on BART, sir, please put that away." They said nothing! By saying nothing, they are validating that it is OK to eat on BART.

I just don't know why they couldn't have verbally warned him...it takes less than 2 seconds to say "no food on BART". What good is a rule then?

8 comments:

Sarah said...

You ACTUALLY saw the BART police!!!I thought they were a myth. I would think BART would take advantage and ticket the people eating on the train (and make some $$). But apparently it doesn't matter.

Anonymous said...

I know someone who almost became a BART Police officer several years ago. The individual was hired before beginning Police Academy. Until the Academy session started, they went on 'ride, er in this case walk-along' with BART police. This individual told me that they essentially will not enforce the no drinking/food rule, especially when it comes to morning coffee - they'd rather let it go than have a confrontation with someone who "hasn't had their morning coffee". Of course this was several years ago - I guess they still follow the apparently unwritten BART Police rule of not enforcing the no food / drinks on BART.

bartmusings said...

I definitely know that BART police presence on trains should be used for something more urgent and more threatening than food/drinks. I know I was half-sarcastic in my post but of course I'd want them to catch a thief than stop and tell someone to not eat or drink! :) But, this time around, it really didn't seem like they were in a huge rush to go anywhere. They were talking about the Sharks and walking leisurely down the aisle. I wished they could have at least told the guy that he's not supposed to eat on BART. No need for a ticket, just a verbal warning would make people take this rule seriously. This guy was straight eating a burger and stuffing fries in his mouth! How could they not spend 2 seconds to say something? It wasn't just a beverage. I don't get it. Just 3 words...NO FOOD HERE!

Anonymous said...

BART police don't ride trains unless they are working so they don't care whether or not they are filty. I saw a BART cop watch a kid spit sunflower seed shells on the floor of the train and they did and said nothing. They don't consider it real police work.

Anonymous said...

Over the weekend I was riding the MAX up in Portland, Oregon. A panhandler came onto the MAX train and the train operator made a polite announcement reminding everyone that panhandling was not permitted on MAX. The guy stopped panhandling and wound up talking with some kids up at the front of the car for awhile.

Anonymous said...

The MAX is decent. I like how I could take it from the PDX air port to past the Rose Garden for $2. And if you're feeling REALLY risky, you can try it without a ticket.

Out of the few times I've ridden it, I've only seen 1 person board the train and ask to see a ticket. Luckily I opted to pay the $2.00 or whatever it was.

Anonymous said...

bartmusings, you would be surprised at what BPD gets called to investigate.

IF they were on the train for another reason, then I could [almost] let it go, but I do agree, even a simple comment would have been helpful, but to do nothing is unfortunate.

I does not take much for any other non-eating patron on the train to say, "Excuse me officer, could you do something about the person eating?" NOt sure what sort of response that would have recieved but...food for thought.

Anonymous said...

I completely agree with you, bartmusings. Why have the no food rule if no one will enforce it? Why have the police on BART if they don't do anything? As a passenger who follows the rules, it is disheartening that others so blatantly disregard them with no consequence.